2020 Coastal Lunar Lanterns

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Coastal Lunar Lanterns

Musqueam / Dené / Sto:lo / Tsleil-Waututh

 

To acknowledge that we are fortunate to be able to gather on the unceded territory of the Coast Salish People, these lanterns are created with the designs of Indigenous artists from the Stó:lō, Dené, Musqueam, and Tsleil-Waututh nations in 2020 to celebrate one of the most important traditions in Asia – Lunar New Year. Celebrate like no other – LunarFest, with support from Tourism Vancouver, Vancouver Convention Centre and Indigenous Tourism BC, is proud to present these lanterns that are truly unique to the City of Vancouver.

Salish Sea

This design is a Salish Sea motif featuring the teachings and culture of the artist’s ancestors. This contemporary iconography of the Pacific Northwest includes representations of Black Fish, Dog Fish, Eagles, & Salmon. The Salmon symbolizes instinct, determination and persistence. Salmon is also a symbol of abundance, wealth and prosperity because the Salmon is the primary food source for the Coast Salish. It is also symbolic of dependability and renewal, representing the provider of life. Salmon in pairs are good luck.

The Black Fish (Orca/Killer Whale) symbolizes family, community and protection. He is said to protect those who travel away from home and to lead them back when the time comes. Orcas travel in large family groups, working together to preserve themselves. Orcas will often stay their whole life with the same family. It is believed that humans and orcas are closely linked, and that when great chiefs die, they become killer whales.

2020 Coastal Lunar Lanterns 01 Salish Sea_Thomas Cannell

Thomas Cannell / Musqueam

Born on Musqueam traditional territory in 1980, Thomas has worked alongside his mother, Coast Salish artist Susan Point as a carver and designer. In 2014, Thomas was awarded a British Columbia Achievement Award for First Nations Art and is currently a board member on the British Columbia Arts Council.

Lone Wolf

A lost lone wolf who’s been separated from its pack, calls out each night to communicate for others who may feel similar. During the day he hunts and travels seeking shelter to survive. Often he’ll need to compete to feed himself, as a lone wolf is unrecognized by other packs. He gains strength throughout his journey that gives him abilities other wolves lack. Senses that are heightened gaining an edge in combat.

This piece is a reflection of some people’s lives, who are abandoned, separated or forgotten and as the world keeps moving without them, they keep fighting for themselves.

2020 Coastal Lunar Lanterns 02 Lone Wolf_John Velten

John Velten / Dené

Born and raised in Coquitlam, John has been an illustrator from a young age. John has studied Business and Fine Arts production under the mentorship of Alano Edzerza, and Design Foundations through the mentorship of Rick Adkins. He continues his practice carving and sculpting today with artist Phil Gray. John has been commissioned by the City of Vancouver for multiple installation works and is a recent recipient of the Museum of Anthropology Shop Emerging Indigenous Artists Contest for his Hummingbird design. John continues into the New Year with aspirations to continue creating pieces and connections of admiration.

Red Fawn

The piece is a combination of Coast Salish design principles, from hand drawn or carved mediums and also from woven textile patterns. The red fawn in this piece, is representative of the medicine that a fawn offers, in its curiosity, exuberance for life, and its gentleness. The zigzag patterns and coloring in the background depict paths travelled in the forests.

2020 Coastal Lunar Lanterns 03 Red Fawn_Carrielynn Victor

Carrielynn Victor – Xémontélót / Sto:lo

Born into an Indigo generation with an innate desire to make progressive change through art, voice and action, Carrielynn is fueled by the passion to leave positive imprints within the earth and the people. Carrielynn was born and raised in Coast Salish territory, or the Fraser Valley, nurtured by many parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles. Carrielynn currently lives in the community her late father came from, Cheam, and works for the Stó:lō Tribal Council & The People of the River Referrals Office, providing research for Rights & Title matters as well as serving in a liaison role to community leadership.

Protector of the Mountain

The face on top is a representation of the artist’s ancestors sending prayers out to cover the land and people. The mountains are shaped like salmon heads because the snowmelt is the water they swim in and represents a strong connection in the artist’s Salish culture.

2020 Coastal Lunar Lanterns 04 Protector of the Mountain_Zachary George

Zachary “SKOKAYLEM” George / Tsleil-Waututh

Born and raised in North Vancouver and now living in Chehalis, BC. His work is inspired by his late grandparents, Chief Dan and Amy George, and Robert and Betty Edge. Zac studied carving with Don Joe of Chehalis and is proud to use the Coast Salish artistic style. He lives the rich cultural lifestyle of the Salish People: he is a hunter, fisherman, and follows the traditional spirituality practiced by his people for centuries.

Venue / Time

VANCOUVER

Jack Poole Plaza
Jan 18th – Feb 9th, 2020

© 2022 The Society of We Are Canadians Too

Coastal Lunar Lanterns

Coastal Lunar Lanterns

Giant Indigenous Lantern Exhibition

 

To acknowledge that we are fortunate to be able to gather on the unceded territory of the Coast Salish People, these lanterns are created with the designs of indigenous artists from Squamish, Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh along with an indigenous artist from Taiwan Atayal tribe to celebrate one of the most important traditions in Asia – Lunar New Year.  Celebrate like no other – LunarFest, with support from Tourism Vancouver and Vancouver Convention Centre, is proud to present these lanterns that are truly unique to the City of Vancouver.

Lanterns created by: Yi Lun Yao, Taiwan

2019 Coastal Lunar Lanterns Artwork 01 Salish Giant Cory Douglas

Salish Giant

Based on a local Squamish legend, the waters were once home to a large mythological creature that helped create the geography of the inlet. In his sketch, an upside down massive octopus is making up the space for the ocean. The line work hatch pattern of the mountains creates a distinctive graphic break between water and sky.

Cory Douglas (Squamish/Vancouver)

Born in Vancouver and a Squamish Nation member with Haida and Tsimshian ancestry. Cory began his business ‘Modern Formline’ as a graphic artist and is now proficiently designing drums, tattoos, original paintings, and hand engraved jewellery.

2019 Coastal Lunar Lanterns Artwork 02 Spirit of Life_Thomas Cannell

Spirit of Life

Light has the power to evoke spiritual forces because of the vitality it represents to almost every culture. In Coast Salish culture, the winter months are spent telling stories and celebrating life by singing and dancing around a large fire in the longhouse. It is a beautiful scene of flickering & twirling light. Cannell has tried to embody the Spirit of Life and celebration in the design for this beautiful cross-cultural lantern display. This modern Coast Salish artwork displays colours that are traditionally seen at contemporary lantern festivals, and portraits a child with a lantern in hand, who is joyfully dancing in the moonlight.

Thomas Cannell (Musqueam/Vancouver)

Born on Musqueam traditional territory in 1980, Thomas has worked alongside his mother, Coast Salish artist Susan Point as a carver and designer. In 2014, Thomas was awarded a British Columbia Achievement Award for First Nations Art and is currently a board member on the British Columbia Arts Council.

2019 Coastal Lunar Lanterns Artwork 03 Praying to the crows_Zachary George

Praying to the Crows

Symbolizing the relationship between humans and the crows of Vancouver, the three moons designed represent both lunar icons and the people. The crows are known to bring joy and messages to the people they fly over. When crows are flying in flocks over the city, it brings people happiness to see how they have survived the harsh developments in the city and continue to bring happiness to all of Vancouver. “Spò:l” means crow in Tsleil-waututh.

Zachary “SKOKAYLEM” George (Tsleil-Waututh/Vancouver)

Born and raised in North Vancouver and now living in Chehalis, BC. His work is inspired by his late grandparents, Chief Dan and Amy George, and Robert and Betty Edge. Zac studied carving with Don Joe of Chehalis and is proud to use the Coast Salish artistic style. He lives the rich cultural lifestyle of the Salish People: he is a hunter, fisherman, and follows the traditional spirituality practiced by his people for centuries.

2019 Coastal Lunar Lanterns Artwork 04 Sharing_Milu Hayung

Sharing

Atayal loves sharing and following customs (known as “gaga” in Atayal). This artwork is inspired by Atayal’s traditional weaving pattern, facial tattoo style, and its core belief in sharing and “gaga”. One of the “gaga” is that the spoils from the hunt should be shared with each other, it is how the community remains connected and engaged closely. This concept is symbolized by the wild boars. Another “gaga” is the facial tattoo. In order for people to cross the “rainbow bridge” and get to heaven after death, they have to earn their facial tattoo first. For women, it’s by being skilled in weaving.  This is depicted by the traditional Atayal weaving pattern and the female with facial tattoo in the artwork.

Miru Hayung (Atayal/Taoyuan, Taiwan)

A Taiwanese indigenous artist from Zihing tribe of Atayal in Taoyuan, Taiwan. In Atayal, “miru” means “creative writing or painting”. His artworks emphasize on the theme of “continuous life”.  His colourful abstract artworks reflect themes such as achieving balance in nature, ever-changing characteristic in nature, as well as the exquisite human emotion.

Venue / Time

VANCOUVER

Jack Poole Plaza
Jan 30th – Feb 18th, 2019

© 2022 The Society of We Are Canadians Too

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